Superhero by day, Hanu by night .
Montreal | 21

 

But to me, my mother’s English is perfectly clear, perfectly natural. It’s my mother tongue. Her language, as I hear it, is vivid, direct, full of observation and imagery. That was the language that helped shape the way I saw things, expressed things, made sense of the world.

Lately, I’ve been giving more thought to the kind of English my mother speaks. Like others, I have described it to people as ‘broken” or “fractured” English. But I wince when I say that. It has always bothered me that I can think of no way to describe it other than “broken,” as if it were damaged and needed to be fixed, as if it lacked a certain wholeness and soundness. I’ve heard other terms used, “limited English,” for example. But they seem just as bad, as if everything is limited, including people’s perceptions of the limited English speaker.

Mother Tongue, Amy Tan (via rniguelangel)

whatsagarb:

ruinedchildhood:

Court Dismissed, bring in the dancing lobsters.

When I was little I thought they actually did this in court

whatsagarb:

ruinedchildhood:

Court Dismissed, bring in the dancing lobsters.

When I was little I thought they actually did this in court

zabsofnightvale:

you know you’ve achieved true greatness when the advertisement before your video is FOR your video

zabsofnightvale:

you know you’ve achieved true greatness when the advertisement before your video is FOR your video